The Non-dairy Conundrum

They should invent a word to describe the sensation you get when the pharmacist tells you that the problem you seem to be having is related to your sinus and so you should lay off the dairy products. As he counted the prescribed tablets, I replied, “Ok for how long?” to which he responded nonchalantly,  “Well I mean you should try to just lay off the dairy as much as possible.”.


When the pharmacist says to lay off the dairy products

I then began to feel quite *insert invented word for sensation here*. Was I hearing correctly or was this a case of mistaken identity? The temptation to run to a doctor for a second opinion was pressing or should I say first opinion since this was not a doctor after all (no offence). Either way, by second opinion I really mean a different opinion that would allow me to continue to consume the dairy products which I’ve grown to love. Is that too much to ask?

Well I guess it was. I began to think of alternatives but I was haunted by images of bread sticks (preferably Pizza Hut) and Creamy Alfredo pasta. I was in my own real life version of ‘Cloudy with a Chance of … every dairy food imaginable’. That night when it was time for my eat-before-taking-the-tablet dinner, I thought to myself hmm no cheese, ok cornflakes and mil…. no not that, crix and…hmmm …ok crix and jam it is! If this were to become a lifestyle change and a drive to be healthier then of course to Google we go. So there it was, now someone explain to me the sorcery of the following picture.


This picture is a screenshot I took while browsing a site that usually has good tips for these types of health/exercise/food related questions. You know things like, “What did I do to deserve this?”,”How to give up dairy and not die?”, “At home remedy to reverse a sinus diagnosis.” I was in the ‘Healthy Eating’ tab as you can see. How you gone advertise KFC on a site like this?? The juxtaposition made the temptation too real and the Zingers are too tasty, not to mention the popcorn chicken, coleslaw and biscuits. If ever there was a time to feel like Pepe the frog ’tis now.


Jesus take the wheel

Am I exaggerating a rather simple situation which people have endured for years? Am I being insensitive to those who have to refuse dairy by force and not by choice? Aren’t there now a wider assortment of non-dairy alternatives available than 10 years ago? Well perhaps so but one must vent and what better way, besides Facebook, to freely and publicly vent than on your very own blog?

In a strange way I’m looking forward to this change as a new adventure and a different experience that I’m hoping would all work out in the end. Sometimes the things that are best for us cause us to be uncomfortable at first but are always worth it. Be mindful that everyone has their no dairy story which at times is as ‘simple’ as that or an even greater and seemingly insurmountable challenge. Do your research, ask questions, support each other and you’d find that the weight will become a little lighter. Keep reading and look forward to more.

And remember: No dairy seems scary but sinus problems suck so don’t press your luck.


Elusive raindrop lover

I’ll chase after you
As if we were two raindrops sliding down a window pane
Moving at different paces but our direction’s the same
I’ll catch you eventually somehow
We’ll join so the two shall become one

But the wind of an irresistible hopeless romantic
suddenly blew you off course
You ran in pursuit of the happiness you sought
Our paths would never intertwine
I would drift into a puddle of despair
That would end in a sea of darkness
With such a large expanse of water
There’s no way of telling one drop from the other
I thought then that I had lost you forever

A few years later I glanced over to that girl on the bench
You sat there alone staring at your feet
I sat there beside you
My presence was all I could offer
The two drops met again at the chin of this heartbroken lover
As proof that the elusive raindrops were meant for each other
In that moment a lost love gave birth to another
And I knew it was a sign that we’d be together forever

‘Breathe’: Breaking free from addiction

Breathe is a documentary short directed by Jonathan Remple which portrays the effects of free diving as a means of combatting addiction. Rebecca Illing is the sole protagonist of the film but is able to keep audiences engaged with her down to earth nature. Her story is truly inspiring and provides food for thought on our approach to recovery from addiction.

I found this documentary short to be particularly interesting because in the Caribbean diving is popular as a leisure activity. I would have never thought that diving could be a means to cope with and even overcome addiction. It is presented from a different angle and shows a unique link between nature and mankind.

The underwater cinematography provides stunning shots and a fascinating scenery. This four minute film attests to the adage that quality is often better than quantity. It is evident why this film won the award for ‘Best Documentary Super-Short’ in the Best Short Fest festival 2017. Click here to watch the documentary ‘Breathe’.



When Disaster Strikes

The disaster preparedness panel was hugely anticipated in light of recent hurricanes that ravaged parts of the Caribbean. The panel of specialised professionals, was able to offer a wide range of perspectives on the central focus of the panel, disaster readiness. The panellists were Akil Nancoo, experienced meteorologist working with the Trinidad and Tobago Meteorological Service; Jerry David, Disaster Management Coordinator of the Diego Martin Regional Corporation; Professor Richard Robertson, geologist and volcanologist at the Seismic Unit; Shelly Bradshaw, Mitigation Manager at the Office of Disaster Preparedness Management (ODPM); and Crystal Fortwangler, visiting filmmaker and director of It Ain’t Easy Being Green (also screened at this year’s Green Screen festival).


The discussion began after a series of jaw-dropping pictures showing the effects of heavy rainfall and flooding in Trinidad and Tobago. Mr David gave the historical context and insight into how development, particularly in the Diego Martin region, has led to improper land use, the negative impact of which we see and feel today.  He highlighted that while the Diego Martin Regional Corporation insists on training residents to respond in times of disaster, many in the community do not take advantage of such opportunities.

Ms Fortwangler’s background in environmental anthropology and environmental justice led her to support Mr David’s initiatives to ensure that residents are well prepared and able to assist in times of need.  She spoke briefly of the issue of social justice following a natural disaster by stating, “Who is giving the money and the resources and what are the consequences of this deal? There is a social impact due to this vulnerability.” This drove home the point that, as small islands, we must carefully consider our allies, and the terms of our alliances, since the help required after a major disaster tends to leave us bound to our financiers.


Given the population’s negative view of the ODPM in recent times, Ms Bradshaw started by explaining that the ODPM is a coordinating entity and is not the organisation to offer all the assistance in the event of a natural disaster. She identified the organisation’s lack of resources and, like most of the other panellists, citizens’ complacent attitude as major challenges. In my opinion, the role of the ODPM was well explained but remained unclear and conflicting when compared to what actually happens. I was hoping for a much deeper discussion in this regard.


Robertson provided a different perspective when he stated that the phrase ‘natural disaster’ should be interchanged with ‘natural phenomenon’. He specified that they occur regardless of what we do and believes we should do all we can to sensitise the public on their human and environmental impact in order to reduce the damage when they do happen. It was worrying to be reminded that preparation for a natural disaster must take place many months in advance, for while newer buildings are made to withstand earthquakes and proper drainage is constructed in newer communities, it is clear that much of our current infrastructure requires upgrading.

The comments on inadequate infrastructure, lack of resources and a complacent population were enough to prove that we are not ready for natural disasters. Using a brochure on disaster preparedness distributed by the ODPM, Mr David asked the audience if we had enough drinking water stored and had placed important documents in secure packaging. The tone of the murmurs coming from the audience suggested that many of us were not prepared. He then summed up the discussion of the panel when he stated, “Don’t ask if Trinidad is ready. Ask if you are ready.”


‘Our Waters’:Protecting our marine resources (Panel Discussion)

The first panel discussion of the 2017 Green Screen Environmental Film Festival  was held on Saturday 4th November at the Medulla Art Gallery. Entitled ‘Our Waters’, the panel considered the challenges facing the environment and the responsibility of varying institutions to protect our marine resources. The short film series was relevant, thought provoking and engaging.

The panelists were Hamish Asmath, Geographical Information Systems Officer in the Geomatics Unit at the Institute of Marine Affairs, Dr. Sharda Mahabir, Project Manager at the Water Resources Agency of WASA,Gerard Alleng, climate change senior specialist with the Climate Change and Sustainability Division of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Courtney Rooks, naturalist, conservationist, explorer and ecotourism professional and Ronald Roach, CEO of the Trinidad and Tobago Solid Waste Management Company Limited (SWMCOL).

Moderator Francesca Hawkins, asked for an overview of our current situation before delving into solutions and initiatives. The statistics put forth by the panelists on the rapidly depleting coral reefs, the polluted rivers and the negative effects of climate change in the Caribbean were alarming. Mr. Asmath noted that the recent hurricanes in the region caught everyone’s attention, however, he urged the public to be equally concerned with subtle dangers such as rising sea levels.

One of the primary hindrances to protecting our water resources is minimal collaboration among the relevant institutions. Rooks stated, “The big problem is that there is no network of humans but individuals who want change and can’t do it alone.” Lack of funding is also a major setback as the environment is not prioritised. “Currently, the cost of the leaching system (which we need) is 21 million (TT) dollars and we were given 1 million dollars by the government.” lamented Mr. Roach. He then suggested that less government funding should be spent on mitigation and be reallocated to public education to change the complacent attitude of citizens towards the environment.

Dr. Mahabir spoke to initiatives geared towards improving the environment and specifically our marine resources. She spearheaded the ‘Adopt a River’ project in recent years to clean rivers across Trinidad and Tobago. The ‘Water Warriors’ programme taught residents to test their water and they were educated on recycling. This initiative started in Carapo as the first community based recycling programme in Trinidad and Tobago. It was quite successful and has since spread to other communities.

Mr. Alleng presented a model for being ‘blue and circular’. In explaining this model, he stated, “As islands, our principal asset is the sea. A sustainable ocean economy is possible: a circular model where waste is seen as valuable as the input for something else and for this we must improve efficiency.” Questions and comments from the audience led to immersive discussion. Amidst the devastating effects of climate change, it was refreshing to hear the positive efforts being made. I still feel that a lot more can be done to educate the public and perhaps more people would be willing to change their destructive behaviours and contribute positively to more initiatives if they are aware of such. Dr. Mahabir ended on a high note by encouraging those present to use trending hashtags, get everyone involved and to make it personal so they understand their reciprocal effect on the environment.

Don’t believe that the challenge to change something is too great.
Holly Trew, Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences at the UWI Cave Hill, Barbados
Short film series: ‘The Reef’

Be sure to check out the Green Screen website for more details on the film festival which ends on Friday 10th November, 2017.



Green Screen 2017: Opening Night

The Green Screen Environmental Film Festival 2017, held its opening reception at the Digicel IMAX theater on November 2nd, 2017. The evening began with remarks from the Minister of Agriculture, Senator Clarence Rambharat; Sagicor representative, Sharda Mahabir and the mastermind of the festival, Carver Bacchus of Sustain T&T.

The feature film, “Death By A Thousand Cuts” co-directed by Jake Kheel and set in Hispaniola, renders more than blood; it explores the tension between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, the complexities of the expanding charcoal trade and the consequences of mass deforestation in those countries. The audience were left with their mouths ajar and lingering questions on their tongues.

The post-film discussion, added dimension to this already multi-layered film, which took approximately five years to complete. Kheel gave detailed supplementary information that helped to give a balanced outlook and quenched the audience’s thirst.

Film fans, filmmakers, activists, policy makers, entrepreneurs and other members of the public – the stakeholders of our environment, mingled afterward to chat and network. The room buzzed with laughter and conversation as the night progressed on an eclectic note.


Present were young, local creatives, familiar faces such as the Wadada Sisters of the Wadada Movement, a Caribbean-based fashion label; Anya Ayoung-Chee, Fashion Designer; Maya Cozier, Director of the film ‘Short Drop’ which won the award for Best T&T Short Film at Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival 2017 and Shari Petti, Director of the documentary short film, ‘Sorf Hair’ the People’s Choice Best Film at TTFF. “It was clear that the film was thoroughly researched and investigated, well shot, engaging and objective; you didn’t really see too much of a bias anywhere like ‘Haitians are bad, Dominicans are angels’ or anything,” commented Shari Petti.


The Wadada Sisters


Bocas Lit Fest Bloggers Ashlee Burnett (left) and Apphia Barton (right)

Others described the film as “excellent”, “an eye-opener”, “interesting and informative” and some wished that the film would be screened again so they would have the opportunity to invite friends and family.

The 7th launch of the Green Screen Environmental Film Festival was filled with promise and set high expectations for the days that were to follow. Carver Bacchus stressed the importance of public education and stated that there is ‘no quick fix’ when it comes to the issues that plague our environment. There is no doubt that Green Screen is a catalyst and continues to provide a platform where all stakeholders can come together in matters concerning the environment.


The Green Screen team

Collaborative piece written by the Bocas Lit Fest Bloggers:

Ashlee Burnett
Apphia Barton
Giselle Permell
Kimberly Inglis

Visit Green Screen’s website for more. Instagram: greenscreentt  Twitter: @GreenScreentt



Somehow always present
It mimics a shadow and sadly appears when the light that I need most is fading away
These shadows that plague me
These eternal insecurities

It’s a ravenous monster that feeds on every ounce of trust
And grinds every optimistic bone in my body to the finest dust
This shadow plagues me
This eternal insecurity

It’s the voice in my head telling me it just wont work
And the thought in my mind to fight against a decision I just took
My shadow plagues me
My eternal insecurity

It’s the crazy mixture of anxiety and panic that I nurture
Coupled with the same worries over and over
Many shadows plague me
Many eternal insecurities

And when love finally finds a way in
It gets kicked out the back door
Back out the door it goes
With its head bowed in defeat
Hoping to find an entrance through a vulnerable crack

I wished for your sake that I could erase this part of me
Then I saw that in reality
You are the light that shines brightly
To eliminate the shadow of my insecurities
It was then that I heard a knock at the front door
It was love hoping to enter once more


Spelling duz nut matter… part for (4)


Well, who could dare laugh at a pun more than me? I am all for creativity and playing on words so you had me at ‘ Trini flava’, you know….. flavour —> flava (flav).


However, allow your eyes to drift a bit further and you stumble upon the confusing ‘Savory Tambran Glaze’. Let’s take it word by word. I know that ‘savory’ is the American spelling of the word ‘savoury’ and I am aware that we all still get confused with the American vs. British spelling at times but how you gone be talking about Trini flava and hit me with American spelling? Or perhaps you are referring to the other meaning of the word savory stated here in the Oxford dictionary. I doubt it.

giphy (1)

Maybe tambran is the variation of Raisin Bran made with tam that never caught on or maybe it’s one of those weird made up words that some celebrity will joyfully bestow on their newborn under the guise of ‘ first name’. So what’s tambran? Well that will really have to be ‘tamarind’ which to be honest is yet another example of the fact that the English language has many words which are not pronounced as they are spelled or maybe we as Trinidadians are pronouncing it incorrectly which is also very likely. Feel free to torture yourself with a few courses in Linguistics to delve into the intricacies of this phenomenon or just have a great time researching it on Google.


But let’s be honest, while that piping hot barra makes it way to your expectant lips, as you bite into a soft aloo pie, when you stare in delight at the seasoned pholourie you get at the Farmer’s Market, Santa Cruz and WHEN you wait for an eternity and a half in a line on Maracas beach and finally sink your teeth into a hefty bake and shark (*catfish) trust me when I say that the last thing on your mind is the spelling of that brown fruit used to make that ‘bess sauce’. If versatile is a word that can be used to describe fruit then it definitely hits the nail on the head when it comes to tamarind.

I know I said word by word but we’ll let the word ‘glaze’ slide for now although we’d much prefer the all encompassing term ‘sauce’ as we know that a true true Trini loves all types of sauces…garlic sauce,pepper sauce, bbq sauce (or should I say babecue: see related post) and the classic ‘fling-in-a-bit-of-everything-in-the-fridge-and-some-herbs’ sauce. All things considered, we allow intentional spelling ‘errors’ which are really a play on words to achieve some greater goal whether it’s to make a joke or encourage creative advertising and branding. In these cases the correct dictionary approved spelling of the word does not matter but please, some are really just errors that ought to be corrected.

Anyway, gotta go! There’s a doubles with slight, laced with a savory tambran glaze that has my name on it.


Stink and Dutty

I’m sure a lot of you would be familiar with the song that is alluded to in the title of this blog post. Many people revelled to this popular tune and some even acted as if the much awaited collaboration between Machel Montano and Bunji Garlin was finally going to be the one thing that would be able to change the price of cheese or at least account for an increase in one’s salary. Anyway, point being that this was a much celebrated song, however, I see very little to dance about in the picture seen below. 2016-02-27_17-46-11

In this picture, there is nothing fun about being stink and dutty. Apart from the many concerns that these pictures would raise about one’s health and more so one’s personal hygiene, the most surprising for me was the fact that this business place was none other than a variety store. Do you know what this means? This means that a VARIETY of items are sold, one of those items being fans. Oh what a convenient but very much ignored fun fact. Now let’s not pretend that we all clean our fans with the same enthusiasm and faithfulness with which we watch the new episode of our favourite series weekly. *cough* Game of Thrones *cough* However, when the fan looks as if its modeling a new line of fur coats designed by Kim Kardashian then I think that warrants some level of cleaning. One can barely see the other side through the fan and God forbid you try to perfect your robot voice on one of these and choke on a dust bunny.

Furthermore, , if you really would prefer not to clean the fan then here’s a wild thought, why not take one that’s on sale to replace this one? When I walked into the store I did not sign up for a dust facial mask, sand bath or Sahara desert simulation but surely enough this LASKO fan was keen on sprinkling me with it’s prized collection of dust particles.


This way to a poo.

I’ll have to say that what strikes me as stink and dutty in this picture is the level of idleness it suggests and the total disregard for public places. I fail to believe that the missing letters on the sign can be attributed to any reason other than human intervention. It’s upsetting that in a public pool, a sign that is supposed to read ‘This way to washroom’ would instead say ‘This way to a poo’. It’s mainly upsetting because in this instance it’s just a sign but this sort of tampering happens in different places and in other aspects in ways that are very off putting.

Given that mini rant and at the risk of sounding hypocritical, it would be remiss of me to ignore the striking linguistic value of this mixture of humour and semantics. One may say that either sign fulfills its purpose of directing the reader to the right place (if you get my drift). Others may focus on the ambiguity of the statement ‘This way to a poo’ in which case I would definitely be heading in the other direction.

What I’m trying to point out is that sometimes we deliberately neglect to do what would make life better for others in order to fulfill our selfish pursuits and we glorify or allow things that otherwise should be changed. Would it be so hard to clean or replace the fan? Is the sign simply a meaningless prank or is it a reflection of a deeper issue that we  often bypass. As I said earlier, in this instance it’s ‘just a fan’ and ‘just a sign’ but let’s not be indifferent and complacent because we realise that the implications of these things don’t affect us directly or personally enough.



Adventures of a Youth Blogger (3): Dr. Edward Baugh

On Saturday 29th April at 11 a.m I found myself engaged in a one on one session with Dr. Edward Baugh, Professor Emeritus of English at the Mona campus of the University of the West Indies and renowned poet. He was immediately put on the spot with a question he dislikes which was ‘What made you want to be a poet?’ Nonetheless, he answered by stating that his inspiration started in his childhood and stemmed from listening to sermons in church as well as reading various books in the bible. He then spoke briefly of the responsibility of a poet and stated that each poem must ‘somehow make a difference’.

Apart from his early influences, Mr. Baugh delved further into other facets of inspiration. During the time of his schooling, the poetry that he would have been exposed to included the romantic English poets as well as Browning’s dramatic monologues. In university, he would go on to discover the works of Derek Walcott which he would often read during his free time while in the library. This all served as food for thought for upcoming writers and even amateur writers like myself to see how we can find a balance between the great inspiration we receive from the writings of others and the need to establish our own voice through our writings.

We were privy to have a sneak peak into the musings of a very talented writer as he stated, “When I’m writing a poem, I must hear it. It must have a kind of resonance.” Upon reflection, one may think that it’s only in writing the poem that it can then be read, heard and appreciated, but in this case Baugh allows us to see the writing process from a different perspective as he goes from inception to the point of putting pen to paper. It was then quite funny and not surprising that he would go on to state that while in school he loved to read when he was getting a cold as he liked the sound and depth that would then characterise his voice. The value that Baugh placed on sound, even from a young age, was quite evident.

In my secondary school, studying Literature for the CSEC examinations was compulsory but it was an obligation which I had grown to love over time. Hearing poems being read by the teacher and my classmates was quite entertaining but I have to admit that it is incomparable to hearing it from the lips of the poet himself. Baugh read his well known poem which I had studies years before in school, ‘A Carpenter’s Complaint’ which was evidently a favourite among those in the audience.

It was an opportunity not only to hear the poem read the way in which it was intended to be read but to hear the story behind the masterpiece and the intentions of the poet. All the same, Baugh is always open to interpretations and critiques as well. He stated, “Critics are useful if not necessary.” Edward Baugh’s presence at the Bocas Lit Fest left us with the warmth of the smile he maintained throughout the one on one session and it was evident why those in the audience who were past students of his had addressed him with such fondness upon asking their questions.


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